Durosia, Tumbled
higgins34:

fuchsimeon:

beccabummie:

all-four-cheekbones:

oldfuckingsport:

iminmypants:

mlletimelord:

castielcampbell:

death-limes:

muffinass:

and in that moment, the entire movie theater burst into tears

i think this was the moment that made most of us despise umbridge more than voldemort

most of us?! don’t you mean ALL of us?? I don’t think even Voldemort liked this bitch!

No one likes Umbridge.

I heard, one time, a dementor kissed her and IT died

Voldemort committed genocide, but Umbridge dared to be female while she abused her power. 

The point isn’t that Umbridge was worse than Voldemort; it’s that everyone hates her more. And I think it has nothing to do with her being a woman and everything with being the sort of cruel most of us have actually experienced.
I mean, look at Voldemort. He’s basically Wizard Hitler, which is, obviously, an incredibly terrible thing to be. But most people—especially the younger people in Harry Potter’s target audience—have not had their parents murdered by a xenophobic cult leader. Nor have they fought for their lives against giant snakes, been kidnapped for dark rituals, or watched numerous friends die in front of them. Voldemort’s crimes are numerous, but they’re distant and fantastical, like hearing about a serial killer on the news.
But they have had that one teacher who inflicts extra punishments just because they don’t like you. They’ve complained to parents and authorities only to be ignored. They’ve sat through pointless classes and been silenced when they criticize. Umbridge is that teacher we all hated because she made our lives miserable and we were powerless to stop her. And as we grow out of school, there are still people in positions of power who act like her. The manager who denies your schedule requests and penalizes you for invented infractions. That customer who complains to corporate because their scam didn’t work, and the corporate decision to listen to their story. Cops performing illegal searches because they know you don’t have any proof.
Yes, torturing and killing numerous people is worse than terrorizing a handful of schoolchildren, but Voldemort is the bad guy in a fairy tale. Umbridge is personal.

*drops the mic*

Voldemort is the villain we never hope to face.
Umbridge is the villain we face every day.

*mic breaks through the earth’s Crust*

Yep.

higgins34:

fuchsimeon:

beccabummie:

all-four-cheekbones:

oldfuckingsport:

iminmypants:

mlletimelord:

castielcampbell:

death-limes:

muffinass:

and in that moment, the entire movie theater burst into tears

i think this was the moment that made most of us despise umbridge more than voldemort

most of us?! don’t you mean ALL of us?? I don’t think even Voldemort liked this bitch!

No one likes Umbridge.

I heard, one time, a dementor kissed her and IT died

Voldemort committed genocide, but Umbridge dared to be female while she abused her power. 

The point isn’t that Umbridge was worse than Voldemort; it’s that everyone hates her more. And I think it has nothing to do with her being a woman and everything with being the sort of cruel most of us have actually experienced.

I mean, look at Voldemort. He’s basically Wizard Hitler, which is, obviously, an incredibly terrible thing to be. But most people—especially the younger people in Harry Potter’s target audience—have not had their parents murdered by a xenophobic cult leader. Nor have they fought for their lives against giant snakes, been kidnapped for dark rituals, or watched numerous friends die in front of them. Voldemort’s crimes are numerous, but they’re distant and fantastical, like hearing about a serial killer on the news.

But they have had that one teacher who inflicts extra punishments just because they don’t like you. They’ve complained to parents and authorities only to be ignored. They’ve sat through pointless classes and been silenced when they criticize. Umbridge is that teacher we all hated because she made our lives miserable and we were powerless to stop her. And as we grow out of school, there are still people in positions of power who act like her. The manager who denies your schedule requests and penalizes you for invented infractions. That customer who complains to corporate because their scam didn’t work, and the corporate decision to listen to their story. Cops performing illegal searches because they know you don’t have any proof.

Yes, torturing and killing numerous people is worse than terrorizing a handful of schoolchildren, but Voldemort is the bad guy in a fairy tale. Umbridge is personal.

*drops the mic*

Voldemort is the villain we never hope to face.

Umbridge is the villain we face every day.

*mic breaks through the earth’s Crust*

Yep.

nickmb:

brianmichaelbendis:

 Jean Grey meets Spider-man by Mark Bagley (and me)
and now i write the x-men :)

Ultimate Spider-Man meets Jean Grey of the Ultimate X-Men. It’s funny because of the gritty realism.

nickmb:

brianmichaelbendis:

 Jean Grey meets Spider-man by Mark Bagley (and me)

and now i write the x-men :)

Ultimate Spider-Man meets Jean Grey of the Ultimate X-Men. It’s funny because of the gritty realism.

higgins34:

gailsimone:

fyeahsuperheroes:

durnesque-esque:

cassandracroft:

If a girl is to do the same superman thing where he takes off his disguise, we just look pervy. Not the same effect

First of all: bullshit.

Secondly: If you are not doing the Linda Carter spin, then you’re doing it wrong.


I’ve fallen in love

I certify this 100% Amazonian and awesome.

I want to learn whatever the fuck she is teaching on the top of whatever the hell mountain it’s at because Hellllll Yeaaaaaah. 

higgins34:

gailsimone:

fyeahsuperheroes:

durnesque-esque:

cassandracroft:

If a girl is to do the same superman thing where he takes off his disguise, we just look pervy. Not the same effect

First of all: bullshit.

image

Secondly: If you are not doing the Linda Carter spin, then you’re doing it wrong.

image

I’ve fallen in love

I certify this 100% Amazonian and awesome.

I want to learn whatever the fuck she is teaching on the top of whatever the hell mountain it’s at because Hellllll Yeaaaaaah. 

moon-crater:

lara-jay:

hipstersaur:

stafftomesword:

the-archlich:

fuckyeahvikingsandcelts:

bad-mojo:

necoho:

onslaughtsix:

hoganddice:

infuriatingly-adorable:

whiskey-wolf:

And this is what happens when a masterfully crafted katana collides with a masterfully crafted longsword.
Suck it, katana

And that is what happens when a masterfully crafted scalpel collides with a masterfully crafted guillotine.
Does nobody understand that longswords and katanas are two different kinds of tool?Longswords are essentially sharpened fucksticks designed to destroy the shit out of anything resembling armor that comes their way. They shatter bone, jelly flesh, and essentially fuck people up by sheer inexorable force of being a goddamn sharp steel bar.
Katanas don’t do that.They’re not meant to withstand collision with armor or a brick wall or a charging fully outfitted warhorsebecause the circumstances of its development didn’t call for that. It’s a precision instrument. It’s designed to be lightweight, outmaneuver, and find weak spots, not go barreling into people hack-n-slashing your way to victory. It’s a specialized tool.
In a sense this reflects a core difference between cultures; katanas are a shitton of work and preparation to make the execution as efficient and streamlined as possible, while longswords are more durably and simply made in response to a climate that would require a soldier to be a one-man battering ram in battle.

Actually no.The vaunted differences between the katana and the longsword are largely myth.First off: longswords are nowhere near as heavy as everyone thinks they are, the weight difference between an average longsword and an average katana is very slight.Second: Longswords are not just random hack and slash weapons. THERE’S NO SUCH THING AS JUST RANDOM HACK AND SLASH WEAPONS EVERY WEAPON IN THE WORLD REQUIRES SKILL AND FINESSE! To use a longsword requires precision and training and skill. If you think the longsword requires no skill I suggest you try fighting a master, or go read The Flower of Battle by Fiore dei Liberi.Third: The structural differences between a katana and a longsword make little to no functional difference.The reason the katana is so narrow and has a slight curve has nothing to do with functionality and EVERYTHING to do with iron being very rare in Japan.The curve on a katana is only enough to help increase the cutting length while using the minimum of material.The differences between Katana technique and longsword technique are about as large as the differences between Italian longsword technique and German longsword technique.Because there’s only so much you can do with a long sharp piece of metal.Fourth: The Katana did not evolve. They came up with one design and never changed it for thousands of years, not once. The design process of the longsword is well documented, it went through thousands of permutations and redesigns to make it more efficient, more useful and more adaptable.Fifth: Longsowrds took a fuckton of work and preparation. Ok, I’m about to burst your bubble here, but bear with me because you’re going to learn something.When the Japanese developed their folded steel technique it was in response to the fact that their iron ore was not only rare, it was also so full of impurities it was brittle and pretty awful at being a weapon. All the Japanese folded steel technique really did was bring their steel up to the quality that was standard in most European steel.Why do I say Japanese folded steel?BECAUSE THE REST OF THE WORLD HAD ALREADY GOTTEN THERE ABOUT A THOUSAND YEARS BEFOREHAND!Japanese Folded Steel is primitive compared to some of the shit we were producing for weapons at the same time in Europe.And do you want to know who the masters of that were? THE FUCKING VIKINGS!Japanese folded steel involves hammering one piece of steel into a fucking sandwhich over and over and over again.Viking folded steel involves taking separate rods of Iron (For a flexible core) and Steel (for a hard edge) AND FUCKING BRAIDING THEM TOGETHER! LITERALLY BRAIDING TWO DIFFERENT KINDS OF METAL IN THREE OR MORE PIECES TOGETHER AND THEN HAMMERING THAT INTO A SWORD! JUST TRY AND TELL ME THAT’S NOT THE MOST BEAUTIFUL THING YOU’VE EVER HEARD!Sixth: The Katana was a backup weapon. It was literally the last resort. It got a lot of reverence in bushido because of how pretty it was and for no other reason. But the chief weapon of the samurai was actually their Kyu (longbow) followed by their Naginata (A spear, which was essentially like a katana on a stick and WAY more effective) or their Tetsu bo (A big conical wooden club covered in iron studs) and then if none of that worked then they would use the katana. Seventh: The function of a longsword depends on the historical period you’re thinking of. In the 15th century and onward they were for dealing with plate armour and their design changed to reflect that.But they existed long before then and had many different functions, people of each period tailoring them for their specific needs.Eighth: Swords are expensive. Doesn’t matter what period or country you’re in a sword is a LOT of metal and metal is ALWAYS expensive. In almost every culture spears and axes were FAR more common than swords.This caused a widespread phenomenon that historians/archaeologists/folklorists refer to as “the cult of the sword” where the rarity and beauty of swords causes them to become an object of reverence. Almost every culture that developed swords also developed a weird spiritual reverence for them. The cult of the sword died off FAR later in Japan than it did in Europe which is why katanas have so much reverence and mythology attached to them even into the modern age.Ninth: Stop idealising other cultures because they’re over there.

Fuckin’ weeaboos.

Adding to that (regarding the vikings):
That braiding technique described earlier on had the same reasons for its development as that of folded steel; bog iron was the most common available ore in Scandinavia and not very pure either.
Furthermore, that made metal indeed very expensive. Most warriors in viking culture wore boiled leather helmets and body armour if they wore armour at all. The most common form of defence was the wooden shield we all know from depictions (actually one thing out of very few that pictures get right).
The weapons that found most employment were spears (cheap because they largely consisted of wood plus practical as they allowed you to engage your enemy from a distance whilst you held your shieldwall intact). Axes were predominantly wood, too, and could be used when your spear breaks, falls or became lodged in a dead or dying body.
Swords and metal armour were the equipment of the wealthy (chieftains).

i rarely reblog things for commentary, but here it is. (did i mention my hardon for longswords?)

Freaking Vikings knew what they where doing

Hey kids, look: Education!
Also as a reminder: Nearly all Japanese swords (and weapons in general) were based on weapons they imported from the Chinese. Why more Chinese people don’t get upset about people attributing Chinese achievements and weapons to the Japanese, I’ll never know.

Reblogging because swords AND awesome historical facts is pretty much the mental equivalent of a peanut butter cup. YUM.



I feel I learned something today.

Fascinating.

Cool image. Awesome discussion.

moon-crater:

lara-jay:

hipstersaur:

stafftomesword:

the-archlich:

fuckyeahvikingsandcelts:

bad-mojo:

necoho:

onslaughtsix:

hoganddice:

infuriatingly-adorable:

whiskey-wolf:

And this is what happens when a masterfully crafted katana collides with a masterfully crafted longsword.

Suck it, katana

And that is what happens when a masterfully crafted scalpel collides with a masterfully crafted guillotine.

Does nobody understand that longswords and katanas are two different kinds of tool?Longswords are essentially sharpened fucksticks designed to destroy the shit out of anything resembling armor that comes their way. They shatter bone, jelly flesh, and essentially fuck people up by sheer inexorable force of being a goddamn sharp steel bar.

Katanas don’t do that.They’re not meant to withstand collision with armor or a brick wall or a charging fully outfitted warhorsebecause the circumstances of its development didn’t call for that. It’s a precision instrument. It’s designed to be lightweight, outmaneuver, and find weak spots, not go barreling into people hack-n-slashing your way to victory. It’s a specialized tool.

In a sense this reflects a core difference between cultures; katanas are a shitton of work and preparation to make the execution as efficient and streamlined as possible, while longswords are more durably and simply made in response to a climate that would require a soldier to be a one-man battering ram in battle.

Actually no.
The vaunted differences between the katana and the longsword are largely myth.

First off: longswords are nowhere near as heavy as everyone thinks they are, the weight difference between an average longsword and an average katana is very slight.

Second: Longswords are not just random hack and slash weapons. THERE’S NO SUCH THING AS JUST RANDOM HACK AND SLASH WEAPONS EVERY WEAPON IN THE WORLD REQUIRES SKILL AND FINESSE! To use a longsword requires precision and training and skill. If you think the longsword requires no skill I suggest you try fighting a master, or go read The Flower of Battle by Fiore dei Liberi.

Third: The structural differences between a katana and a longsword make little to no functional difference.
The reason the katana is so narrow and has a slight curve has nothing to do with functionality and EVERYTHING to do with iron being very rare in Japan.
The curve on a katana is only enough to help increase the cutting length while using the minimum of material.
The differences between Katana technique and longsword technique are about as large as the differences between Italian longsword technique and German longsword technique.
Because there’s only so much you can do with a long sharp piece of metal.

Fourth: The Katana did not evolve. They came up with one design and never changed it for thousands of years, not once. The design process of the longsword is well documented, it went through thousands of permutations and redesigns to make it more efficient, more useful and more adaptable.

Fifth: Longsowrds took a fuckton of work and preparation. Ok, I’m about to burst your bubble here, but bear with me because you’re going to learn something.
When the Japanese developed their folded steel technique it was in response to the fact that their iron ore was not only rare, it was also so full of impurities it was brittle and pretty awful at being a weapon. 
All the Japanese folded steel technique really did was bring their steel up to the quality that was standard in most European steel.
Why do I say Japanese folded steel?
BECAUSE THE REST OF THE WORLD HAD ALREADY GOTTEN THERE ABOUT A THOUSAND YEARS BEFOREHAND!
Japanese Folded Steel is primitive compared to some of the shit we were producing for weapons at the same time in Europe.
And do you want to know who the masters of that were? THE FUCKING VIKINGS!
Japanese folded steel involves hammering one piece of steel into a fucking sandwhich over and over and over again.
Viking folded steel involves taking separate rods of Iron (For a flexible core) and Steel (for a hard edge) AND FUCKING BRAIDING THEM TOGETHER! LITERALLY BRAIDING TWO DIFFERENT KINDS OF METAL IN THREE OR MORE PIECES TOGETHER AND THEN HAMMERING THAT INTO A SWORD! JUST TRY AND TELL ME THAT’S NOT THE MOST BEAUTIFUL THING YOU’VE EVER HEARD!

Sixth: The Katana was a backup weapon. It was literally the last resort. It got a lot of reverence in bushido because of how pretty it was and for no other reason. But the chief weapon of the samurai was actually their Kyu (longbow) followed by their Naginata (A spear, which was essentially like a katana on a stick and WAY more effective) or their Tetsu bo (A big conical wooden club covered in iron studs) and then if none of that worked then they would use the katana. 

Seventh: The function of a longsword depends on the historical period you’re thinking of. In the 15th century and onward they were for dealing with plate armour and their design changed to reflect that.
But they existed long before then and had many different functions, people of each period tailoring them for their specific needs.

Eighth: Swords are expensive. Doesn’t matter what period or country you’re in a sword is a LOT of metal and metal is ALWAYS expensive. 
In almost every culture spears and axes were FAR more common than swords.
This caused a widespread phenomenon that historians/archaeologists/folklorists refer to as “the cult of the sword” where the rarity and beauty of swords causes them to become an object of reverence. 
Almost every culture that developed swords also developed a weird spiritual reverence for them. The cult of the sword died off FAR later in Japan than it did in Europe which is why katanas have so much reverence and mythology attached to them even into the modern age.

Ninth: Stop idealising other cultures because they’re over there.

Fuckin’ weeaboos.

Adding to that (regarding the vikings):

That braiding technique described earlier on had the same reasons for its development as that of folded steel; bog iron was the most common available ore in Scandinavia and not very pure either.

Furthermore, that made metal indeed very expensive. Most warriors in viking culture wore boiled leather helmets and body armour if they wore armour at all. The most common form of defence was the wooden shield we all know from depictions (actually one thing out of very few that pictures get right).

The weapons that found most employment were spears (cheap because they largely consisted of wood plus practical as they allowed you to engage your enemy from a distance whilst you held your shieldwall intact). Axes were predominantly wood, too, and could be used when your spear breaks, falls or became lodged in a dead or dying body.

Swords and metal armour were the equipment of the wealthy (chieftains).

i rarely reblog things for commentary, but here it is.

(did i mention my hardon for longswords?)

Freaking Vikings knew what they where doing

Hey kids, look: Education!

Also as a reminder: Nearly all Japanese swords (and weapons in general) were based on weapons they imported from the Chinese. Why more Chinese people don’t get upset about people attributing Chinese achievements and weapons to the Japanese, I’ll never know.

Reblogging because swords AND awesome historical facts is pretty much the mental equivalent of a peanut butter cup. YUM.

I feel I learned something today.

Fascinating.

Cool image. Awesome discussion.

tripiam:

x3elizabeth:

requiredchaos:

stevensweatshirt:

relitseleirda:

jellyphile:

cas-hellodean:

poeticdarkbeauty:

youngblackandvegan:

and that’s why you don’t go around fixing people

and that’s why you don’t give up pieces of yourself to make someone else whole

We do this more than we think. Sometimes we reject those who have helped us the most. Other times, we help those who allow their egos to hide their humilities.

someONE FUCKING MAKE THAT TEDDY BEAR HAPPY BEFORE I CHOKE BECAUSE I HAVE TEARS BRIMMING MY EYES HELP ME

image

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image

image

image

image

image

image

it may take time but there is someone waiting to hold your hand

My tears

I’ve reblogged this already but I love it.

The first time I blogged this he was broken and alone. Now he has love :’)

For the last three decades many Americans have puzzled over a system that gives an R to a movie in which a women is carved up by a chainsaw and an NC-17 to one that shows a woman sexually pleasured. From such ratings one might conclude that sexual violence against women is OK for American teenagers to see, but that they must be 18 to see consensual sex. What message does this send to the kids the MPAA presumably means to protect?

Carrie Rickey

(via fireworkselectricbright)

“You have to question a cinematic culture which preaches artistic expression, and yet would support a decision that is clearly a product of a patriarchy-dominant society, which tries to control how women are depicted on screen. The MPAA is okay supporting scenes that portray women in scenarios of sexual torture and violence for entertainment purposes, but they are trying to force us to look away from a scene that shows a woman in a sexual scenario which is both complicit and complex. It’s misogynistic in nature to try and control a woman’s sexual presentation of self. I consider this an issue that is bigger than this film.”

-Ryan Gosling on the controversy around the rating of his film ‘Blue Valentine’

(via misandry-mermaid)

I know I’ve been wondering things like this for years… it’s part of the horrid inconsistency in ratings.

This is awesome. :)

uchicagoadmissions:

Indiana Jones Mystery Package

We don’t really even know how to start this post. Yesterday we received a package addressed to “Henry Walton Jones, Jr.”. We sort-of shrugged it off and put it in our bin of mail for student workers to sort and deliver to the right faculty member— we get the wrong mail a lot.

Little did we know what we were looking at. When our student mail worker snapped out of his finals-tired haze and realized who Dr. Jones was, we were sort of in luck: this package wasn’t meant for a random professor in the Stat department. It is addressed to “Indiana” Jones.

What we know: The package contained an incredibly detailed replica of “University of Chicago Professor” Abner Ravenwood’s journal from Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark. It looks only sort of like this one, but almost exactly like this one, so much so that we thought it might have been the one that was for sale on Ebay had we not seen some telling inconsistencies in cover color and “Ex Libris” page (and distinct lack of sword). The book itself is a bit dusty, and the cover is teal fabric with a red velvet spine, with weathered inserts and many postcards/pictures of Marion Ravenwood (and some cool old replica money) included. It’s clear that it is mostly, but not completely handmade, as although the included paper is weathered all of the “handwriting” and calligraphy lacks the telltale pressure marks of actual handwriting. 

What we don’t know: Why this came to us. The package does not actually have real stamps on it— the outside of the package was crinkly and dirty as if it came through the mail, but the stamps themselves are pasted on and look like they have been photocopied. There is no US postage on the package, but we did receive it in a bin of mail, and it is addressed to the physical address of our building, Rosenwald Hall, which has a distinctly different address from any other buildings where it might be appropriate to send it (Haskell Hall or the Oriental Institute Museum). However, although now home to the Econ department and College Admissions, Rosenwald Hall used to be the home to our departments of geology and geography

If you’re an applicant and sent this to us: Why? How? Did you make it? Why so awesome? If you’re a member of the University community and this belongs to you or you’ve gotten one like it before, PLEASE tell us how you acquired it, and whether or not yours came with a description— or if we’re making a big deal out of the fact that you accidentally slipped a gift for a friend in to the inter-university mail system. If you are an Indiana Jones enthusiast and have any idea who may have sent this to us or who made it, let us know that, too. 

We know this sounds like a joke/hoax… it’s not (at least, from our end).  Any hints, ideas, thoughts, or explanations are appreciated. We’ve been completely baffled as to why this was sent to us, in mostly a good way, but it’s clear this is a neat thing that either belongs somewhere else— or belongs in the halls of UChicago admissions history.

Internet: help us out. If you’re on Reddit (we’re not) or any other nerdly social media sites where we might get information about this, feel free to post far and wide and e-mail any answers, clues, ideas, thoughts, or musings to indianajonesjournal@uchicago.edu  (yes, we did set up an email account just to deal with this thing). 

**Update: we have heard from Lucasfilm (nerd sidebar: OMG SO COOL) that this is not some type of viral marketing package for any upcoming Indiana Jones films or events. We have narrowed the likely maker down to the most-accurate Ebay match (seller “Ravenbar”) but have not been able to get in touch with the seller, nor do we have any sense of why this would have made its way to our office. More photos of the journal can be found in the Chicago Red Eye here. We will be placing this in the University of Chicago library’s Special Collections once our mystery has been solved, so to those who have asked if it is for sale, sadly, the answer is no. Thanks to all who have sent tips or ideas (and to all of the news organizations that found this cool enough to pick it up)— please keep the ideas coming!**

utnereader:

misterbeaudry:

Skull detail… Will do a coffee stain soon. #skull #drawing #art #illustration #ink (Taken with Instagram)

Beautiful and dark, just right for the equinox. Let us enter.

Very awesome detail work in this piece.

utnereader:

misterbeaudry:

Skull detail… Will do a coffee stain soon. #skull #drawing #art #illustration #ink (Taken with Instagram)

Beautiful and dark, just right for the equinox. Let us enter.

Very awesome detail work in this piece.

Dresden Codak’s X-MEN REBOOT

This is utterly brilliant. I would read this. I would watch this. I would tell other people to do the same.

People, if you’re going to totally reboot something, this is how you do it. It pays proper homage to what came before, hitting on the same core principles of character and story, while being different enough to avoid disdainful direct comparison by any but the most short-sighted, die hard, fanboy.

Bravo!

dresdencodak:

The Premise - I wanted to make an X-Men reboot that plays to the strength of the concepts, namely growing up as a teenager, dealing with those who are different and how to deal with those who hate you.  The primary change in my setting is that the mutations have a clear sci-fi foundation rather than just being random superpowers.  Mutants being “the next stage in human evolution” was biologically dubious in the 60s, and now it’s just corny.  Additionally, I think the X-Men premise only really makes sense in a setting without other superheroes.  With that in mind, here’s my pitch…

Read More